World Polar explorer's ship back in Norway after 100 years

02:26  09 august  2018
02:26  09 august  2018 Source:   9news.com.au

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The ice-going ship that legendary explorer Roald Amundsen attempted to sail to the North Pole in has return “It feels absolutely fantastic to know that Maud is finally back in Norway after nearly 100 years ,” Jan Wangaard, who led the project, told local media outlet NRK.

The ship used by Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen finally returned home Monday, completing its journey around the North Pole 100 years after her chaotic expedition started. Norway wants explorer ship back 80 years after sinking.

a close up of some grass: Explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship is back in Norway© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Explorer Roald Amundsen’s ship is back in Norway The ice-going ship that legendary explorer Roald Amundsen attempted to sail to the North Pole in has returned to Norway after nearly a century.

On Monday, the Maud – which was raised from the seabed off Canada in 2016 – arrived in Bergen.

Amundsen famously became the first man to reach the South Pole in 1911, beating the ill-fated British expedition led by Captain Robert Scott.

a small boat in a body of water: The wreck of the Maud is towed into the Norwegian port of Bergen.© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd The wreck of the Maud is towed into the Norwegian port of Bergen.

But his 1918 expedition to the Arctic aboard the Maud was less successful.

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Oslo (AFP) - The ship used by Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen finally returned home Monday, completing its journey around the North Pole 100 years after her chaotic "The trip was long, but it went well," Jan Wanggaard, manager of the effort to bring the Maud back to Norway , told AFP.

In 1990, Asker Council in Norway bought the ship wreck for just . Oslo: The ship used by Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen finally returned home on Monday, completing its journey around the North Pole 100 years after its chaotic expedition started.

His plan was to sail into the waters around the North Pole during the northern summer and deliberately become stuck in the ice.

The Maud would then become a floating scientific research centre as she drifted into the Arctic Ocean.

a man standing in front of a large ship in a body of water: Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen tried to reach the North Pole in the Maud.© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen tried to reach the North Pole in the Maud.

But after six years of trying and failing to reach the ocean’s northern currents, Amundsen sailed the vessel to Alaska.

With creditors chasing him, the explorer sold the Maud to a fur trading company who moored it on Canada’s northeast coast.

a close up of green water: The remains of the Maud were raised from the seabed off northern Canada in 2016. (Photo: Maud Returns Home).© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd The remains of the Maud were raised from the seabed off northern Canada in 2016. (Photo: Maud Returns Home).

The ship sank in 1931 and remained on the seabed in Cambridge Bay until two years ago when its remains were raised by the Maud Returns Home project.

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Roald Amundsen' s Arctic explorer finally returns to Norway , 100 years after it set out. But his later attempt for the North Pole was not as easy - and the Maud, his ship for that trip, has finally come home.

The ship used by Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen finally returned home Monday, completing its journey around the North Pole 100 years after her chaotic "The trip was long, but it went well," Jan Wanggaard, manager of the effort to bring the Maud back to Norway , told AFP.

The 400-tonne wreck was towed to Greenland where it remained until June this year when it set out for Norway perched on a giant barge.

a group of people on a boat: Restorers aboard the wreck. (Photo: Maud Returns Home).© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Restorers aboard the wreck. (Photo: Maud Returns Home).

“It feels absolutely fantastic to know that Maud is finally back in Norway after nearly 100 years,” Jan Wangaard, who led the project, told local media outlet NRK.

“It brings joy to our hearts to see Maud, still proud after all these years, see her old homeland once again.”

a small boat in a body of water: Starting in June, the Maud was towed from Greenland to Norway where it arrived this week. (Photo: Maud Returns Home).© Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Starting in June, the Maud was towed from Greenland to Norway where it arrived this week. (Photo: Maud Returns Home). Later this month, the wreck will be towed along the coast to Vollen – the port where the ship was built in 1917.

Wangaard hopes it will be displayed in a new museum in the city.

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