Tech & Science 'Snapchat dysmorphia' has social media users seeking plastic surgery

14:06  06 august  2018
14:06  06 august  2018 Source:   cnet.com

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Doctors have coined a new term, " Snapchat dysmorphia ," to describe patients who seek cosmetic surgery procedures to look more like filtered versions of themselves. This isn't the first warning issued about the connection between social media and plastic surgery .

One doctor has referred to this phenomenon as “ Snapchat Dysmorphia .” Instagram Social Media Beauty Plastic Surgery Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

  'Snapchat dysmorphia' has social media users seeking plastic surgery © CNET Everyone seems to look perfect on Snapchat. That's thanks to a vast array of filters and editing options that can change our real-life appearance in an instant.


But obsessively tinkering with how we look on social media can have damaging effects. Doctors have coined a new term, "Snapchat dysmorphia," to describe the psychology of patients who seek cosmetic surgery procedures to look more like the filtered versions of themselves.

While no one is asking for surgically attached Pokemon Pikachu ears, patients are requesting fuller lips, bigger eyes and thinner noses to look more like the altered versions of themselves that appear on apps like Snapchat and Facetune, according to a new article published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Doctors have coined a new term, “ Snapchat dysmorphia ,” to describe the psychology of patients who seek cosmetic surgery procedures to look more like the filtered versions of themselves.Â. This isn’t the first warning about the connection between social media and plastic surgery .

Mom blames plastic surgery addiction on 'Selfie dysmorphia '. Though Engeln points out, seeking smooth and blemish-free skin isn’t a new concept from the social media age.

"This is an alarming trend because those filtered selfies often present an unattainable look and are blurring the line of reality and fantasy for these patients," say the piece written by doctors from Boston University School of Medicine's Department of Dermatology.

"The pervasiveness of these filtered images can take a toll on one's self esteem, make one feel inadequate for not looking a certain way in the real world, and may even act as a trigger and lead to body dysmorphic disorder," the piece adds. Those who suffer from BDD obsess over their perceived physical flaws and can experience extreme anxiety as a result.

Help for those with BDD might include cognitive behavioral therapy, which teaches how to replace negative thought patterns with positive ones. It could also involve prescription medication like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, which are used to treat anxiety disorders.

Coles under fire over plastic bag backflip

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"' Snapchat dysmorphia ' has patients seeking out cosmetic surgery to look like filtered versions of themselves instead, with fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a Snapchat dysmorphia isn't exactly new. Earlier this year, a plastic surgeon known as Dr. Esho coined the phrase, and it was popularized in several

However, doctors believe people are seeking plastic surgery to permanently look like the filtered versions of themselves. “‘ Snapchat dysmorphia ’ has patients seeking out cosmetic surgery to look like filtered versions of themselves instead, with fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a thinner nose,” the

This isn't the first warning about the connection between social media and plastic surgery. Selfies act as "portable funhouse mirrors" that distort noses, a study from earlier this year revealed. And more people are going under the knife because of it.

Why Coles misjudged the plastic bag backlash .
The plastic bags fiasco was doomed from the start - it was a major renegotiation of their bargain with customers and their role in our lives. Companies need to think long and hard before they decide to force a change of norms. It’s a truly strategic move and not a communications activity. It is going to hit the bottom line. If you aren’t ready for that, stick with market norms until change is enshrined in legislation and creates an even playing field.

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