Tech & Science Planets Orbiting Binary Stars Can Be Thrown Into Space

11:07  14 april  2018
11:07  14 april  2018 Source:   ibtimes.com

NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope

  NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope Scientists are excited about the prospect the mission holds for new discoveries, but if you're just learning about the mission now, here's what you need to know.TESS is the successor to Kepler, which revolutionized exoplanet science and is responsible for spotting almost three quarters of the planets astronomers have identified to date. But Kepler will run out of fuel sometime in the next few months, so scientists have been working for years to make sure something would be ready to replace it.

A new study exploring binary stars – stellar bodies orbiting each other – and planets moving around them has revealed worlds involved in such systems are at risk of being ejected into space . David Fleming, a student from University of Washington and the lead author of the study

If one planet gets thrown out, others in the neighborhood might go down with it, the study suggested. A new study exploring binary stars – stellar bodies orbiting each other – and planets moving around them has revealed worlds involved in such systems are at risk of being ejected into space .

a star in the sky: This artist’s concept illustrates Kepler-16b, the first planet known to orbit two stars – what’s called a circumbinary planet. The planet, which can be seen in the foreground, was discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission. New research from the University of Washington indicates that certain shot-period binary star systems eject circumbinary planets as a consequence of the host stars’ evolution.  © Provided by IBT US This artist’s concept illustrates Kepler-16b, the first planet known to orbit two stars – what’s called a circumbinary planet. The planet, which can be seen in the foreground, was discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission. New research from the University of Washington indicates that certain shot-period binary star systems eject circumbinary planets as a consequence of the host stars’ evolution. 



A new study exploring binary stars – stellar bodies orbiting each other – and planets moving around them has revealed worlds involved in such systems are at risk of being ejected into space.

NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope

  NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope Scientists are excited about the prospect the mission holds for new discoveries, but if you're just learning about the mission now, here's what you need to know.TESS is the successor to Kepler, which revolutionized exoplanet science and is responsible for spotting almost three quarters of the planets astronomers have identified to date. But Kepler will run out of fuel sometime in the next few months, so scientists have been working for years to make sure something would be ready to replace it.

Binary stars can throw planetary orbits into chaos | Ars Technica - arstechnica.com. Kepler spacecraft discovers planet orbiting binary star system - www.cbsnews.com. NASA's Kepler space telescope, searching for planets around distant suns, has discovered a Saturn-size world orbiting

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David Fleming, a student from University of Washington and the lead author of the study, posited the theory after taking a close look at short-term eclipsing binaries, or the system in which the orbital path of stars is so close to the line of sight, one star appears to cross the other’s path for a short while.

As bodies orbit closely taking 10 days or less, Fleming pondered over the tidal forces the stars exert over each other and how that may affect the whole star system.

To solve the mystery, he ran a series of computer simulations and found the forces in action “transport angular momentum from the stellar rotations to the orbits,” according to a statement from the university. This leads to slowed stellar rotations and an increased orbital period.

NASA's TESS spacecraft may find 1,600 new planets in the next two years

  NASA's TESS spacecraft may find 1,600 new planets in the next two years On Monday evening, NASA plans to launch a brand new satellite into orbit, courtesy of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. On Monday evening (Tuesday AEST), NASA plans to launch a brand new satellite into orbit, courtesy of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Called TESS (the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite), the spacecraft is designed to detect planets outside our solar system (called exoplanets) that are relatively close to our solar neighbourhood.

If one planet gets thrown out, others in the neighborhood might go down with it, the study suggested. Next Post: A salute to Parker Posey and Dr. Smith in Lost in Space . Recent Posts. FDA expands crackdown on herbal supplement Kratom.

A new study exploring binary stars – stellar bodies orbiting each other – and planets moving around them has revealed worlds involved in such systems are at risk of being ejected into space . Astronomers discovery trio of gas giant planets orbiting distant stars .

The forces expand the stellar orbit and transform it from eccentric or football-shaped into neat circles. This ultimately results in planets, which were originally sitting safe outside, being engulfed and thrown out of the system.

And this is not the only way of ejection, according to the team, there is also a region of instability, where the gravitational forces of the two stars compete. It’s “a region that you just can’t cross — if you go in there, you get ejected from the system,” Fleming said in the same statement. “We’ve confirmed this in simulations, and many others have studied the region as well.”

The group has described the whole process as “dynamical stability limit,” which increases as the stellar orbit expands and ends up throwing planets out of their obit. It is also worth noting that if a single planet gets tossed out, chances are others in the neighborhood will also get disturbed and go down with it.

TESS, NASA's new planet hunter, will search for alien worlds around our nearest stars

  TESS, NASA's new planet hunter, will search for alien worlds around our nearest stars NASA is set to launch a new planet-hunting telescope that promises to send the number of alien planets we know through the roof — and make it easier to search for hints of life.That all changed with the launch of the Kepler space telescope in 2009.

[18-04-14 00:14] This artist’s concept illustrates Kepler-16b, the first planet known to orbit two stars – what’s called a circumbinary planet The study will be presented at the Division on Dynamical Astronomy Conference on April

Binary star systems can throw their planets into space , due to the way their gravity influences pull on each other. NASA scientists have speculated over whether or not Kepler 16-b, a circumbinary planet orbiting the Kepler-16 binary star , could harbor life.

That said, on applying the simulations to all known short-period binary star systems, with planets revolving outside, Fleming and his team found at least one planet in nearly 90 percent of the systems is thrown out due to the impact of stellar evolution. Another member of the team said this is just a preliminary estimate and the actual result could be as high as 99 percent.

The group also noted this might also be the reason why astronomers have not detected too many circumbinary planets — which orbit stars that in turn orbit each other. The work also implies to the search of potential Earth-like planets and suggests worlds involved in such stellar systems might be a poor place to explore or even look.

The study will be presented at the Division on Dynamical Astronomy Conference on April 15-19 and is set to be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

SpaceX blasts off NASA's new planet-hunter, TESS .
NASA on Wednesday blasted off its newest planet-hunting spacecraft, TESS, a $337 million satellite that aims to scan 85 percent of the skies for cosmic bodies where life may exist. "Three, two, one and liftoff!" said a NASA commentator as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) soared into the blue sky atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:51 pm (2251 GMT).The washing machine-sized spacecraft is built to search outside the solar system, scanning the nearest, brightest stars for signs of periodic dimming. These so-called "transits" may mean that planets are in orbit around them.

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