Tech & Science If we’re going to capture our carbon emissions, we might as well put them to use

01:39  10 april  2018
01:39  10 april  2018 Source:   popsci.com

Expert challenges Denmark submarine murder suspect's defence

  Expert challenges Denmark submarine murder suspect's defence A leading submarine expert on Tuesday challenged Danish inventor Peter Madsen's claim that Swedish journalist Kim Wall was killed by toxic fumes in his homemade vessel last year, as he faces trial for her murder. Madsen, 47, who is accused of premeditated murder, sexual assault and desecration of a corpse, has said her death was accidental since the first day of his trial on March 8.He said Wall, 30, died when a hatch fell on her head, but later changed his story after autopsy concluded there had been no damage to the skull.

Reducing emissions is the right goal. But we still need fossil fuels—and the Dakota pipeline. Pixabay Egg whites — they ’ re not just (a cholesterol-free) breakfast anymore. A Japanese researcher has found a way to use mo.

If we can design and engineer technologies that use CO2 rather than fossil fuels to meet our chemical and fuel manufacture needs, then we can Currently, carbon capture typically involves grabbing CO2 emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants, then storing them underground so they can’t

a close up of a piece of cake covered in chocolate: burning charcoal© Pixabay burning charcoal Instead of storing carbon, researchers want to convert it into fuel.

Like many researchers, Phil De Luna finds inspiration in nature — in this case, the way plants use photosynthesis to make food from carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight. He envisions a day when scientists will use water and renewable energy to transform carbon dioxide into products society can use, such as fuel, medicine, or feed for livestock. While scientists tend to talk about carbon capture and storage—one approach to fighting climate change — De Luna thinks the future instead will be about carbon capture and conversion.

Google uses wind and solar to offset all of its operational energy use

  Google uses wind and solar to offset all of its operational energy use It has contracts to purchase three gigawatts of renewable energy.As of now, Google has contracts to purchase three gigawatts of output from solar and wind farms around the world. As part of its green energy efforts, the company has also started publishing an environmental report on its progress and has a website that details its ongoing work.

While scientists tend to talk about carbon capture and storage—one approach to fighting climate change — De Luna thinks the future instead will be about carbon The more news we see, the more accurate the picture of the day our users receive. You are the media! To send news, you need to login.

If we ’ re going to capture our carbon emissions , we might as well put them to use . They 're expected to generate enough electricity to: - Power up to 130,000 homes - Cut 400,000+ tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year.

“The world needs more solutions to climate change. If we can design and engineer technologies that use CO2 rather than fossil fuels to meet our chemical and fuel manufacture needs, then we can completely recycle carbon in a closed loop,” said De Luna, a doctoral candidate in materials science at the University of Toronto.

Humans are altering the climate by burning coal, oil and gas, releasing carbon that was once buried underground into the sky, increasing the volume of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Fuels made from captured carbon—instead of coal, oil, or gas — add no additional CO2 to the atmosphere when burned.

a man wearing glasses: a man working at a lab© Victoria Martinez, Canadian Light Source a man working at a lab

Once the technology that makes this happen becomes wide spread, “we can continue to meet the world’s energy demands using renewable energy, while also providing a source for the consumer goods and materials that we need every day,” De Luna added. “This technology has the potential to provide complete sustainability.”

Google uses wind and solar to offset all of its operational energy use

  Google uses wind and solar to offset all of its operational energy use It has contracts to purchase three gigawatts of renewable energy.Today, the company says it achieved that goal. Google has been working on reducing its carbon footprint and purchasing more renewable energy for some time. In 2007, it committed to being carbon neutral, which it did by purchasing solar and wind energy as well as carbon offsets, and throughout the years, it has reduced its reliance on offsets and purchased greater amounts of renewable energy. In 2017, for every kilowatt-hour of energy Google's operations consumed, it added a kilowatt-hour of solar and wind energy to the grid.

If we ’ re going to capture our carbon emissions , we might as well put them to use . They 're expected to generate enough electricity to: - Power up to 130,000 homes - Cut 400,000+ tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year.

The compelling case for capturing carbon emissions and burying them underground. That’s what we are paying them to provide fossil fuels at a lower price or giving them land for free. When Saudi Arabia says that we ’ re going to charge you less for gas than the cost of producing it, that’s a proper

Currently, carbon capture typically involves grabbing CO2 emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants, then storing them underground so they can’t enter the atmosphere and heat the planet. De Luna and his colleagues, including Oleksandr Bushnuyev, a University of Toronto postdoctoral fellow, are studying developing technologies that could make storage secondary — or even unnecessary. A study describing their work appears in the journal Joule.

“By using renewable energy to convert CO2 into a fuel, one can store that renewable energy, and then, when that fuel is burned, the CO2 can be captured again, closing the carbon cycle,” De Luna said. His team’s concept, which he described as being “at the cusp of becoming commercialisable,” is a semi-finalist for the NRG COSIA Carbon XPrize, a $20 million competition to accelerate the development of technology that can capture CO2 and convert it to usable products.

BHP confirms exit from world coal body over climate stance

  BHP confirms exit from world coal body over climate stance The world's biggest miner BHP said Thursday it was following through on a decision to leave the World Coal Association over climate change policy differences, but would remain a member of the US Chamber of Commerce. The Anglo-Australian giant announced in December it was reviewing industry group memberships to ensure they aligned with its climate and energy stance, which includes tackling global warming through emission reductions.

And if we focus on our historical emission trend in recent years, and we put that together with our understanding That's the kind of thing we ' re going to experience under a four-degree global average temperature scenario. And now, if we ' re all constrained by the same amount of carbon budget

The best way to reduce carbon emissions through population cuts means starting with the most developed countries as they have the We use cookies to improve your experience on our site and to show you relevant advertising. To find out more, read our updated privacy policy and cookie policy .

While conversion technology is still in its infancy, researchers believe the coming decades will bring major advances. Within five to 10 years, for example, electro-catalysis — which stimulates chemical reactions through electricity — could reduce the cost of turning carbon dioxide into fuel and other products. Within 50 or more years, nanotechnology could drive conversion, according to the scientists.

a screenshot of a cell phone: a chart© Joule a chart

“This is still technology for the future,” Bushuyev said. “But it’s theoretically possible and feasible, and we’re excited about its scale-up and implementation. If we continue to work at this, it’s a matter of time before we have power plants where CO2 is emitted, captured, and converted.”

The researchers acknowledge that there are obstacles to be overcome, chief among them the cost of electricity needed to drive chemical reactions. But they believe the price tag will decrease as renewable energy becomes more widespread.

“At the heart of this technology is the catalyst, the material that converts CO2, and work still needs to be done to make the catalyst more efficient, selective and stable over a long period of time before costs can come down,” De Luna said. “In terms of scale, it is an engineering matter at this point, and there are many people working on scaling up this kind of technology.”

Australia's AGL to host coal-to-liquid hydrogen export trial for Japan's Kawasaki Heavy

  Australia's AGL to host coal-to-liquid hydrogen export trial for Japan's Kawasaki Heavy <p>Japan's Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd (7012.T) will use a power station owned by top Australian electricity producer AGL Energy Ltd (AGL.AX) for a trial of coal-to-liquid hydrogen conversion.</p>Japan's Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd (7012.T) will use a power station owned by top Australian electricity producer AGL Energy Ltd (AGL.AX) for a trial of coal-to-liquid hydrogen conversion, the companies and the Australian government said on Thursday.

If we ' re going to capture our carbon emissions , we might as well put them to use . Instead of storing carbon , researchers want to convert it into fuel. Marlene Cimons at 09:05 AM Apr 10 2018.

What Is Carbon Capture ? This technology might be the only thing standing between the world It’s a pretty new technology that’s nowhere near able to compensate for our carbon emissions , at least not anytime soon. In less than a decade, we ’ re going to use up the last of our carbon budget, which

solar panels on a roof© Pixabay solar panels on a roof

He believes there is no danger that technology to recycle carbon dioxide would be a lifeline for coal- and gas-fired power plants to churn out carbon pollution. “Not at all,” he said. “The biggest issue with renewable energy penetration isn’t that people don’t want it. It’s that our needs as a society do not match when the sun shines or when the wind blows.

“The only way we can actually encourage clean renewable energy is to level out the energy supply so that intermittency issues are no longer a problem, and this technology provides a way to do that,” he said. “The majority of our hydrocarbon economy, which leads to things like plastic and building materials, are also derived from fossil fuels. If we can replace fossil fuels with captured CO2, then we can solve the intermittency and energy storage problem, capture CO2 from the atmosphere and put it to work, and build plastics and materials out of an emission waste.”

The research was an attempt to gain “clear insight into whether this could be economically viable, and whether it’s worth the time to invest in it,” he said. Their work envisions “a pathway for what we can do with carbon dioxide conversion in the coming decades.”

Coal industry grapples with change and the challenges of transition .
When AGL CEO Andy Vesey announced a new project to convert brown coal to liquid hydrogen in Victoria's Latrobe Valley this week, transition was on his lips.&nbsp;"As we transition to cleaner technologies," Mr Vesey said, "this project may spark a reinvigoration of Latrobe Valley's energy industry by generating a competitive edge in a new market.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!