The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Tech & Science Intel will patch all recent chips by the end of January

06:41  09 january  2018
06:41  09 january  2018 Source:   engadget.com

Samsung preps Chrome OS tablet with a high-end camera

  Samsung preps Chrome OS tablet with a high-end camera Samsung's Chromebooks haven't always been smashing successes, but it's clearly willing to shake up its formula when necessary. There aren't many other clues, although the detachable design suggests this will likely be relatively compact with a 12-inch or smaller screen. To us, the bigger questions are the launch details. You might see Samsung unveil Nautlius at CES later in January, but we wouldn't call it a guarantee. And then there's the matter of price.

Intel , which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week. Today on stage at CES

Intel will patch all recent chips by the end of January . The potential impact of the major processor security flaw that went public last week can't be understated.

a man standing in front of a flat screen monitor© Provided by Engadget The potential impact of the major processor security flaw that went public last week can't be understated. But hardware and software companies alike have been quick to patch fixes for the first two reported exploits, Meltdown and Spectre.

Intel, which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week. Today on stage at CES, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich promised the remaining 10 percent would see fixes by the end of the month.

"We believe the performance impact of these updates is highly workload dependent," Krzanich said, referring to claims that processors may be slowed by as much as 30 percent as a result of the fixes. "We expect some may have a larger impact than others, so we'll continue working with the industry to minimize the impact on those workloads over time."

Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info

  Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info Hardware and software manufacturers including Apple and Microsoft began pushing out patches that protected against attacks making use of the flaw. The flaw, which Intel dubbed a side-channel analysis attack,  was discovered "months ago" Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said on CNBC Wednesday. The discovery was made by researchers at Google's Project Zero security group, which reported it to the affected companies. The vulnerabilities undermine some of the most fundamental security constraints employed by modern computers, said Craig Young, a researcher at computer security company Tripwire.

Intel says it will patch 90 percent of recent chips by next week - www.engadget.com. 14:52 18 january 2018. Today on stage at CES, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich promised the remaining 10 percent would see fixes by the end of the month.

Krzanich reiterated Intel's stance that there's no evidence either exploit has been used to steal customer data, and said the company is "working tirelessly on these issues to ensure it stays that way."

There's still no word on a timeline for when affected processors made over five years ago will be patched.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from CES 2018.

Intel admits Spectre patch problems also affect newer Core chips .
The chipmaker said it's working on a fix for its buggy Spectre/Meltdown patches.Shenoy also discussed how the Spectre and Meltdown fixes will affect servers, staying true to Intel's promise to be more transparent. He revealed the initial data the company got from benchmarking server platforms using two-socket Intel Xeon Scalable -- its latest microarchitecture -- systems. It found that the fixes don't affect servers' energy efficiency and it didn't detect a slowdown when running Java business applications.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!