Tech & Science Intel will patch all recent chips by the end of January

06:41  09 january  2018
06:41  09 january  2018 Source:   Engadget

Intel and AMD announce first Core i5 and i7 chips with Radeon graphics

  Intel and AMD announce first Core i5 and i7 chips with Radeon graphics Back in November, longtime rivals Intel and AMD shocked the computing world when the two companies announced that they’d be teaming up to create laptop chips that combined Intel’s Core line of processors with AMD’s Radeon graphics. And now at CES 2018, the first fruits of that partnership have been revealed, in the form of a pair of Intel Core i5 and i7 chips powered by discrete AMD Radeon RX Vega M GPUs. Along with the processor and GPU, each unit also has 4GB of HMB2 VRAM onboard, which Intel says should help drastically save space internally for laptops while increasing battery life.

Intel and MobilEye will also begin gathering data to create maps for autonomous driving systems. They'll be relying on the software built into MobilEye's EyeQ4 system-on-a- chip that's embedded in 2 million cars already on the road, including BMW's, VWs and Nissans.

Intel will patch 90 percent of all Meltdown/Spectre affected processors made in the past 5 years this week, and the rest by the end of January . The move to patch these processors means that Intel won’t be recalling its chips , which is good for the company.

a man standing in front of a flat screen monitor© Provided by Engadget The potential impact of the major processor security flaw that went public last week can't be understated. But hardware and software companies alike have been quick to patch fixes for the first two reported exploits, Meltdown and Spectre.

Intel, which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week. Today on stage at CES, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich promised the remaining 10 percent would see fixes by the end of the month.

"We believe the performance impact of these updates is highly workload dependent," Krzanich said, referring to claims that processors may be slowed by as much as 30 percent as a result of the fixes. "We expect some may have a larger impact than others, so we'll continue working with the industry to minimize the impact on those workloads over time."

Intel pledges transparency after Spectre, Meltdown vulnerability

  Intel pledges transparency after Spectre, Meltdown vulnerability The last week or so has seen a lot of activity around Meltdown and Spectre, two CPU flaws in modern chips from the likes of AMD and Intel. Apple, Microsoft and Google have provided interim fixes for their respective hardware, but it will take much more than simple patches (that can cause more harm than good) to truly eradicate the issue. Just a few hours after Intel revealed that there may be more slowdowns from its Meltdown processor fix, the company's CEO Brian Krzanich has written an open letter to further detail the steps Intel is taking to deal with the issues.

Intel teams up with Ferrari for AI-powered drones to analyze races. The Peak will be available for pre-order beginning January 15th and will begin shipping in early February. It's expected to retail for around 0 when it does.

90 percent of recent processors affected by Meltdown/Spectre will see fixes this week. Intel , which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week.

Krzanich reiterated Intel's stance that there's no evidence either exploit has been used to steal customer data, and said the company is "working tirelessly on these issues to ensure it stays that way."

There's still no word on a timeline for when affected processors made over five years ago will be patched.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from CES 2018.

Samsung phones will have functioning FM chips from now on .
Samsung is the latest company to team up with NextRadio to bring FM service to its new phones. Radio might seem outdated, but it has its uses. First of all, it's free. Additionally, the NextRadio app, which connects to local FM stations, uses significantly fewer than traditional streaming services — to the tune of 20 percent less data and three times less battery. And finally, in an emergency, FM radio is much more reliable to send and receive information than other services.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!