Tech & Science Shark expert says the Reef can be saved

15:50  05 october  2017
15:50  05 october  2017 Source:   MSN

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Seasoned shark expert and diver Valerie Taylor says we can save the Great Barrier Reef but doesn't believe it will happen. A leading shark expert and diver who worked on the Jaws movies believes the damage done to the Great Barrier Reef will never be reversed, even though it could be .

Marine experts say a fatal shark attack on the Great Barrier Reef was a highly unusual event and is unlikely to affect the tourism industry. Transcript. LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: The last thing the Queensland tourism industry wants heading into summer is fear of shark attacks keeping visitors away.

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Video provided by AFP

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How to Reduce Shark Attacks -- And Save Sharks . She and Neil Hammerschlag, a shark expert who has studied great whites in South African waters, told Discovery News that the McCosker said he has seen white sharks "that are at least 18 feet long off Dangerous Reef , South Africa."

Ahead of this, experts said that revising the plan for a more achievable goal of maintaining ecological function would be more realistic, while accepting the overall health status of reef declines over time, reports Michael Slezak for The Guardian.

A leading shark expert and diver who worked on the Jaws movies believes the damage done to the Great Barrier Reef will never be reversed, even though it could be.

Valerie Taylor, 82, has been diving with sharks and other marine life along with her late husband Ron since the 1950s.

The pair were even consulted before Jaws was turned into a movie to see if it was a filmable story, and made all the natural footage of great whites used in Steven Spielberg's 1975 film and the sequel.

"Any time you see a whole shark or a shark swimming free, that's an Australian shark, that's one we filmed," Taylor told AAP.

Valerie Taylor (R) © Provided by AAP Valerie Taylor (R)

Taylor appears in upcoming Australian documentary, Blue, by filmmaker Karina Holden which shows how the marine world is it a critical juncture and that it is possible to save our oceans and marine life.

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Gray Reef Shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). The gray reef shark is one of the major predators on the coral reef . Its highly streamlined body allows it a great deal of speed and maneuverability in the water.

Experts have said that the Great Barrier Reef can no longer be saved in its present form because of the extent of climate change. What are the recommendations for the World Heritage Site? ( Mark Kolbe | Getty Images ).

"It is an extraordinary film and it's one that needed to be made," Taylor said.

"It should be shown at every school in the whole world because if I had control I would be standing on street corners yelling out 'Go and see Blue, everybody must see Blue'."

Taylor has also been diving in the Great Barrier Reef since the 1960s and has seen how, when left alone, it can repair itself.

"In 1967 I saw incredible bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef and horrific crown-of-thorns (starfish) damage. My husband and I said 'It's finished' and when we got our own boat in 1981 we went back to those reefs and they were beautiful. They'd been left alone," she said.

"If it's left alone, nature will take care of it, it will come back."

Almost half of the coral on the Great Barrier Reef is dead because of human activity, and Taylor doesn't see it returning to its natural glory again.

"We just can't leave it alone any more, there's too many people all wanting their little bit of whatever; coral, fish. It's been plucked, it's been harvested to pieces, and then there's the pollution. In the 60s, as far as I can remember, there was no pollution. It's come and it's very very bad," she said.

But as long as people are profiting from activity that pollutes the Great Barrier Reef, Taylor can't see things turning around.

"Most Australians would be very happy for the Barrier Reef not to be harvested and not to be polluted, but the people who have caused the problems have caused these problems making money and I don't think it will ever stop until the way to make money utilising this great coral wonderland is no longer viable," she said.

This housing expert thinks Australian investors may be heading towards the 'cliff edge' on loan repayments .
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