Tech & Science Waymo simulation is teaching self-driving cars invaluable skills

15:03  11 september  2017
15:03  11 september  2017 Source:   Engadget

Alphabet Finishes Reorganization With New XXVI Company

  Alphabet Finishes Reorganization With New XXVI Company Alphabet Inc. is forming a new holding company designed to finalize its evolution from Google into a corporate parent with distinct arms that protects individual businesses in far-flung fields like health care and self-driving cars. The new entity, called XXVI Holdings Inc., will own the equity of each Alphabet company, including Google. The new structure legally separates Google from other units such as Waymo, its self-driving car business, and Verily, a medical device and health data firm.Google co-founder Larry Page announced Alphabet two years ago to foster new businesses that operate independently from Google.

The simulation is a virtual home away from home (the real world) for Waymo 's self - driving vehicles. Here, you'll find a replica of every real-world mile the autonomous cars have driven. To ensure the vehicles have got the skills down, the company doubles up with real-world driving and its test track.

Waymo simulation is teaching self - driving cars invaluable skills . Alphabet's autonomous vehicles unit is dishing up more info on its 'Carcraft' software.

  Waymo simulation is teaching self-driving cars invaluable skills © Provided by Engadget Last month, Alphabet offered up its first proper look at Carcraft. The simulation is a virtual home away from home (the real world) for Waymo's self-driving vehicles. Here, you'll find a replica of every real-world mile the autonomous cars have driven. And, each day, Waymo's 25,000-strong fleet of Chrysler Pacificas traverse 8 million of these simulated miles. That's according to the company's latest blog post, which further breaks down its software. By honing in on a traffic signal in a particularly busy intersection, Waymo demonstrates how Carcraft can teach its connected vehicles to envision an exhaustive amount of scenarios (including hazards). In turn, the cars can then practice the manoeuvres that will help them safely navigate these situations in the real world.

Waymo and Uber Head for a Self-Driving Car Crash in Court

  Waymo and Uber Head for a Self-Driving Car Crash in Court Both companies have a lot to lose.But Waymo, the company formed from the Google Inc. self-driving car project, hasn’t won yet. There are no more fact discovery hearings before the trial begins on Oct. 10, and Waymo is running out of time to locate the 14,000 computer files it claims engineer Anthony Levandowski stole while in its employ and transferred to Uber’s driverless program, which he took over last year. Without that smoking gun, Waymo, a unit of Alphabet Inc., may have a tough time directly tying Levandowski’s actions to Uber’s alleged trade-secret theft, forcing it to try to convince a jury using strong but circumstantial evidence.

Driving the Mercedes Simplex while thinking about the transportation future. Roberto Baldwin nervously got behind the wheel of the 1902 model (built in 1903) Mercedes Simplex 40. Surprisingly, a car that's over 100 years old has a lot to tell us about the next revolution in automobiles.

Waymo simulation is teaching self - driving cars invaluable skills . Alphabet's autonomous vehicles unit is dishing up more info on its 'Carcraft' software.

First up, the company uses its custom-built sensors (found on top of its vehicles) to digitize a road. In this case, it's focussing on a five-lane intersection in Mesa, Arizona - - complete with identical dimensions, lanes, curbs, and traffic lights. Its software can then drive this small stretch of tarmac thousands of times over. Now, it knows "to inch forward at the flashing yellow signal, and slot in after oncoming traffic."

  Waymo simulation is teaching self-driving cars invaluable skills © Waymo That's not all. To make its cars even smarter, Waymo's simulation takes one turn and throws thousands of variable situations in the mix. Everything from the speed of oncoming cars and the timing of traffic lights can be manipulated to prepare its vehicles for real-world conditions. On top of that, Waymo also changes the original street scene, by adding in cars, pedestrians and cyclists that may not have been present in the original capture. This process, known as "fuzzing," can even simulate motorbikes splitting a lane, or joggers zig-zagging across the street. The end goal, however, remains the same: To get the cars ready for the chaos of the real world.

Germany Adopts 'Ethical' Self Driving Rules

  Germany Adopts 'Ethical' Self Driving Rules While U.S.' proposed self-driving legislation are yet to go to vote on the Senate floor, the German cabinet has passed what it calls 'ethical' self-driving rules.The legislation contains rules such as saving humans before animals and property, saving lives without discrimination and that self-driving software should contain safeguards against malicious hacking.

Waymo simulation is teaching self - driving cars invaluable skills . Last month, Alphabet offered up its first proper look at Carcraft. The simulation is a virtual home away from home (the real world) for Waymo 's self - driving vehicles.

Waymo simulation is teaching self - driving cars invaluable skills . Alphabet's autonomous vehicles unit is dishing up more info on its 'Carcraft' software.

Once a virtual car learns a new trick, it can share it with the remainder of Waymo's fleet. To ensure the vehicles have got the skills down, the company doubles up with real-world driving and its test track.

Waymo writes: "One of the key advantages of simulation is that you can focus on the most interesting interactions  -- flashing yellow signals, wrong-way drivers, or nimble pedestrians and cyclists  -- rather than monotonous highway miles."

Waymo (Medium)


Intel chips loaded in Waymo self-driving minivans .
Intel on Monday announced its computing tech is being loaded into Waymo self-driving minivans as the chip giant seeks a leading position on the road to autonomous vehicles.  Intel computing technology enabling "real-time decisions for full autonomy in city conditions" has been built into the latest self-driving Chrysler Pacifica minivans being tested by Waymo, a unit of Google-parent Alphabet, according to Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich.

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