Tech & Science Growing global cyberattack hits 200,000 victims so far

19:45  14 may  2017
19:45  14 may  2017 Source:   AFP

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LONDON: The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work.

Microsoft has already released security patches to stave off the spate of global cyberattacks — AFP picLONDON, May 14 —The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said today

The wave of attacks on May 12 hit Britain's health service, Russia's interior ministry and French carmaker Renault, along with many other organisations around the world © Provided by AFP The wave of attacks on May 12 hit Britain's health service, Russia's interior ministry and French carmaker Renault, along with many other organisations around the world The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200,000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work.

An international manhunt was well under way for the plotters behind what was being described as the world's biggest-ever computer ransom assault.

The indiscriminate attack, which began Friday, struck banks, hospitals and government agencies in more than 150 countries, exploiting known vulnerabilities in old Microsoft computer operating systems.

Organisations hit by global cyberattack

  Organisations hit by global cyberattack A huge range of organisations around the world have been affected by the WannaCry ransomware cyberattack, described by the EU's law enforcement agency as "unprecedented".Here are some of the most prominent victims, from Britain's National Health Service (NHS) to French carmaker Renault and the Russian interior ministry.

The unprecedented global ransomware cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in more than 150 countries, Europol executive director Rob Wainwright said Sunday.

The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work. An international manhunt was well under way for the plotters behind what was being described

US package delivery giant FedEx, European car factories, Spanish telecoms giant Telefonica, Britain's health service and Germany's Deutsche Bahn rail network were among those hit.

Europol executive director Rob Wainwright said the situation could worsen on Monday as workers return to their offices after the weekend and log on.

"We've never seen anything like this," the head of the European Union's policing agency told Britain's ITV television, calling its reach "unprecedented".

Ransomware: how hackers take your data hostage: The wave of attacks on May 12 hit Britain's health service, Russia's interior ministry and French carmaker Renault, along with many other organisations around the world © Provided by AFP The wave of attacks on May 12 hit Britain's health service, Russia's interior ministry and French carmaker Renault, along with many other organisations around the world

"The latest count is over 200,000 victims in at least 150 countries. Many of those victims will be businesses, including large corporations.

New cyber chaos appears to have been avoided: Europol

  New cyber chaos appears to have been avoided: Europol European governments and companies appeared early Monday to have avoided further fallout from a crippling global cyberattack, the police agency Europol said. "The number of victims appears not to have gone up and so far the situation seems stable in Europe, which is a success," senior spokesman for Europol, Jan Op Gen Oorth told AFP."It seems that a lot of internet security guys over the weekend did their homework and ran the security software updates."Europol said more than 200,000 computers around the world had been affected over the weekend in what it said was "an unprecedented attack".

London: The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said on Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work.

The unprecedented global cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in scores of countries, Europol said Sunday, warning that the situation could escalate when people return to work. The indiscriminate attack , which began Friday, struck banks

"We're in the face of an escalating threat.

"I'm worried about how the numbers will continue to grow when people go to work and turn on their machines on Monday."

- 'Ooops' message, $300 ransom -

Images appear on victims' screens demanding payment of $300 (275 euros) in the virtual currency Bitcoin, saying: "Ooops, your files have been encrypted!"

Payment is demanded within three days or the price is doubled, and if none is received within seven days the locked files will be deleted, according to the screen message.

Experts and governments alike warn against ceding to the demands and Wainwright said few victims so far have been paying up.

"Paying the ransom does not guarantee the encrypted files will be released," the US Department of Homeland Security's computer emergency response team said.

"It only guarantees that the malicious actors receive the victim's money, and in some cases, their banking information."

Australian business affected by global cyberattack, says Federal Government

  Australian business affected by global cyberattack, says Federal Government Australia seems to have come away relatively unscathed from the global cyber attack that took place over the weekend, with the Federal Government confirming that only one private-sector business has been affected with two more potentially impacted. Australia seems to have come away relatively unscathed from the global cyber attack that took place over the weekend, with the Federal Government confirming that only one private-sector business has been affected with two more potentially impacted.

EU police agency chief warns victim tally in ‘unprecedented’ attack may grow as people return to work Monday to find locked computers.

TEHRAN (FNA)- The unprecedented global ransomware cyberattack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in more than 150 countries, Europol executive director Rob Wainwright said Sunday.

The culprits used a digital code believed to have been developed by the US National Security Agency -- and subsequently leaked as part of a document dump, according to researchers at the Moscow-based computer security firm Kaspersky Lab.

A hacking group called Shadow Brokers released the malware in April, claiming to have discovered the flaw from the NSA, Kaspersky said.

Europol's Wainwright said the attack was unique because the ransomware was combined with a "worm" -- meaning the infection of one computer could automatically infect an entire network.

Microsoft said the situation was "painful" and that it was taking "all possible actions to protect our customers".

It issued guidance for people to protect their systems, while taking the highly unusual step of reissuing security patches first made available in March for Windows XP and other older versions of its operating system.

- Banks, trains and automobiles -

US software firm Symantec said the majority of organisations affected were in Europe.

The companies and government agencies targeted were diverse.

The 22-year-old Brit who stopped the global cyberattack is donating his $10,000 reward to charity

  The 22-year-old Brit who stopped the global cyberattack is donating his $10,000 reward to charity The 22-year-old Brit who "accidentally" halted Friday's devastating global cyberattack says he plans to give his $US10,000 (£7,700) reward to charity. "I don't do what I do for money or fame," he told Business Insider. "I'd rather give the money to people who need it."Late last week, a ransomware attack that made use of a leaked NSA (National Security Agency) "EternalBlue" software exploit spread rapidly round the world, infecting organisations in more than 150 countries, from Britain's National Health Service (NHS) to Spanish telecoms giant Telefonica, Nissan, and FedEx.

The weekend's global cyberattack hit 200 , 000 victims in at least 150 countries and that number could grow when people return to work on Monday, the head of the European Union's police agency says. Cyber security experts say the spread of the virus dubbed WannaCry

The huge cyberattack wiped out display screens at rail stations in Germany Boris Roessler (dpa/AFP). The unprecedented global ransomware cyber - attack has hit more than 200 , 000 victims in more than 150 countries, Europol executive director Rob Wainwright said Sunday.

Europol's Wainwright said few banks in Europe had been affected, having learned through the "painful experience of being the number one target of cyber crime" the value of having the latest cyber security in place.

Russia's interior ministry said some of its computers had been hit, while the country's banking system was also attacked, although no problems were detected, as was the railway system.

French carmaker Renault was forced to stop production at sites in France, Slovenia and Romania, while FedEx said it was "implementing remediation steps as quickly as possible".

Germany's rail operator Deutsche Bahn said its station display panels were affected. Universities in China, Italy and Greece were also hit.

On Saturday, a cyber security researcher tweeting as MalwareTechBlog, said he had accidentally discovered a "kill switch" that could prevent the spread of the ransomware.

The anonymous researcher said registering a domain name used by the malware stops it from spreading, though it cannot help computers already affected.

On Sunday, the researcher warned that hackers could upgrade the virus to remove the kill switch.

"Version 1 of WannaCrypt was stoppable but version 2.0 will likely remove the flaw. You're only safe if you patch ASAP," he tweeted.

Meanwhile G7 finance ministers meeting in Italy vowed to unite against cyber crime, as it represented a growing threat to their economies and should be tackled as a priority.

The danger will be discussed at the G7 leaders' summit next month.


Facebook Wins Dismissal of Suits Brought by Terror Victims .
Facebook won the dismissal of two lawsuits brought by victims of terror attacks and their families who claimed the firm helped groups in the Middle East, such as Hamas, by giving them a platform to air their incendiary views. U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis, in Brooklyn, New York, ruled Thursday that a U.S. law insulates publishers from liability for the speech of others and rejected claims that Facebook could be held responsible for "provision of services" to Hamas in the form of access to user accounts.The lawsuits were the latest around the U.S.

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