Sport Sharks settle supplements saga: report

19:56  14 february  2018
19:56  14 february  2018 Source:   MSN

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News Corp Australia is reporting two years of courtroom battles have ended with just over half of Cronulla’s 25-man 2011 squad coming to a confidential settlement with the Sharks .

The Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks supplements saga was a sports controversy which began in 2011. The Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks , a professional rugby league club playing in the National Rugby League (NRL)

Anthony Tupou and fellow players from the Cronulla Sharks' 2011 NRL squad have reportedly received a $1.2 million settlement from the club. © AAP Image/Paul Miller Anthony Tupou and fellow players from the Cronulla Sharks' 2011 NRL squad have reportedly received a $1.2 million settlement from the club. The seven-year Cronulla drug saga is reportedly over, with 13 players from 2011 finally reaching an apparent $1.2 million settlement with the NRL club.

News Corp Australia is reporting two years of courtroom battles have ended with just over half of Cronulla's 25-man 2011 squad coming to a confidential settlement with the Sharks.

It is understood players will receive vastly differing amounts, ranging from $10,000 up to $300,000.

According to the News Corp report, the payout is covered by Cronulla's insurance company with the club only needing to foot about $100,000 spent on legal fees.

A string of high-profile players including Anthony Tupou joined together to take action against the Sharks.

They sued for negligence, breach of contract and intentional tort during a period in 2011 when sports scientist Stephen Dank ran a supplements program at Cronulla.

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