Money Professional clowns blame 'It' for a drop in business

10:32  14 september  2017
10:32  14 september  2017 Source:   Business Insider Australia

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A group of professional clowns will be holding a rally outside a New York City movie theater playing " It " to show clowns aren't scary. × Recommended For You Powered by Sailthru. Professional clowns blame ' It ' for a drop in business .

The World Clown Association is bracing itself for yet another blow to business as the release date for the Stephen King book-inspired movie remake " It " draws near. It 's a science-fiction character. It 's not a clown and has nothing to do with pro clowning ."

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But for at least one local clown , the movie's success has meant a drop in business . John Nelson, a professional clown , says he's gotten several cancellations in the last few weeks due to the release of the movie and its terrifying clown , Pennywise.

Real life, professional , and staunchly non-evil clowns are also pretty upset Pennywise is rearing his disturbing head once again, and it turns out it is actually costing some professional clowns actual work.

Not everyone is happy with the sensation the movie "It" has become.

The latest adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel broke records at the box office last weekend when it opened with an incredible $US123.4 million domestically, which gave Hollywood a hit movie after three weeks of pitiful performers. But one line of business that isn't finding the same success is clowns.

The main villain in "It" is an evil clown named Pennywise who terrorizes the fictional town of Derry, Maine. His particular interest is snatching up children. Needless to say, mums and dads suddenly aren't setting up clowns to come entertain their kids' birthday parties.

In fact, John Nelson, a professional clown, says he's gotten several cancellations in the last few weeks due to the release of "It" and its marketing of the scary Pennywise.

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A professional clown claims his business in and around New York City has dropped because of the marketing around the horror clown movie " It ." John Nelson, who runs Clowns in Town with a partner, says his business has gotten several cancellations in the last couple of weeks, and he's blaming the

Professional clowns are blaming the upcoming It movie on a loss of business .The horror film is based on Stephen King's 1986 novel of the same name and follows seven children in Maine who are terrorized by It /Pennywise the Dancing Clown , as portrayed by Bil.

It pennywise warner bros © Provided by Business Insider Inc It pennywise warner bros But now he's doing something about it.

Nelson, who runs Clowns in Town with a partner, has put together a rally outside New York City's Union Square Regal Cinema in New York City to show that clowns aren't all that bad.

"Our hope is to raise enough awareness so when people think of clowns they won't think of scary murderers but people who dedicate their lives to bringing joy," Nelson told the NBC News 4, the New York City affiliate of the network.

"Last week, my partner and I had six cancellations of birthday parties," Nelson said. "I have heard of reports from other clowns, in New York and other cities, that they have been canceled as well."

Because many clowns do not ask for deposits in advance and are paid on site, according to Nelson, the popularity of "It" has caused a significant loss.

The movie's release is just the latest hurdle for clowns. Though clowns have been the cornerstone of children's entertainment for over 200 years, in recent generations children have grown more frightened of clowns.

According to a 2015 story in The Guardian on the likability of clowns, a University of Sheffield study of 250 children for a report on hospital design suggested children find clown motifs "frightening and unknowable." And adults are scared, too.

There's even a name for it: coulrophobia.

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