Australia Smiling through the dry: Drought-hit schools work hard to keep students happy

12:56  10 august  2018
12:56  10 august  2018 Source:   abc.net.au

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If they don't get it, maybe some extra work for the whole class to keep them busy. Hi Susan, Great article. I moved to a new school recently, mid way through the year. I appreciate your kind words. I bet you were a great student ! Happy new year!!

They've been through bad droughts before; the last hit in 2009, brutally coinciding with the nation's foreclosure crisis. The California Department of Education says it's going to work with schools hit hardest by the drought to make sure they don't lose funding.

Tiny schools in drought-ravaged regions are finding creative and practical ways to help kids and their families stay positive.

Trundle Central School, in the central west region of New South Wales, has had to sell most of its sheep but principal John Southon said they were not focusing on the negative impacts of the drought.

"What we are doing very well is that we are remaining positive; we're not letting this drought pull us down," Mr Southon said.

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Schools are seeing kids leave as their families fight to combat the consequences of the dry spell. If the drought persists, Hernandez knows that some of his students —mostly poor, Hispanic children whose immigrant parents work the land—won’t stay through the end of the year.

Speaker D: As a high school student , life was fairly simple. I enjoyed talking to the patients, bringing a smile to their faces. It’s really hard - working full-time and studying for my masters. At times, life gets pretty dull and I think about giving it up but it’s the last year now so I ought to keep going.

"We have kids who are working very long hours after school, they're feeding sheep, and they're taking on the pressures of their parents.

"We've socialised our country kids to be tough … they say 'there are kids worse off than us' but I don't believe that anymore.

"These kids are seeing death, dust storms … I want the kids to see Trundle Central School as an oasis in their life."

Students at Trundle Central School who are smiling through the drought.© ABC Central West/Donal Sheil Students at Trundle Central School who are smiling through the drought. The school has come up with a range of creative ways to cope, including upgrading its showers and opening them to the community.

"Some of our kids are washing in buckets because it costs around $700 to get a load of water out to some of these properties," Mr Southon said.

Religion in decline in Australian schools

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During the school year there’s so much going on, so it’s not too hard to find something interesting to write about. In fact, I believe that what gets us through these creative dry spells is continuing to produce, no matter how unsatisfied we are with the outcome.

The student is wasting his own time as well as that of the professor and the other students he keeps interrupting by jumping from one lecture hall to the next. And especially if one is privileged enough to be accepted to Stern or one of the other top B schools , you may have worked hard to get there but

"I don't know whether people understand what it's like for a teenage girl not to be able to have long, therapeutic, I'm-a-teenager-shower in the afternoon.

"A family can pick up a key out of my letterbox and have a hot shower."

The school has also taken donations of old cars which are being used in mechanical and artistic projects.

Year Nine student Nick Williams said the new assignments worked as a distraction from the realities of the drought.

"It gets your brain going, gets your brain off the drought, and puts it on putting a motor back together," he said.

"I can focus, but it certainly sets you back a little bit when your stock aren't going real well."

Technology teacher Lisa Rollins said a student trip to the snow would continue to go ahead, despite families struggling financially.

Woodwork students have been making chopping boards and selling them to raise money for the excursion.

NSW declared '100 per cent in drought'

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Bullying & School Problems. Child Development. It sounds counterintuitive, but the best thing you can do for your child's long-term happiness may be to stop trying to keep her happy in the short-term. "Praise the creativity, the hard work , the persistence, that goes into achieving, more than the

Michelle’s big night. Michelle was quite nervous about her performance in the school play. The other students become jealous, so they try to level things out by giving the favoured student a hard time. She thought it might be the ‘break’ she needed. But while she was happy to get out of work , she

"It's pretty cool to have a positive to look forward to at the moment," Ms Rollins said.

"It's hard to imagine that just two years ago students were being evacuated from the school's back oval because of flooding."

Students have also painted over brown parts of school buildings with white, so that they can escape the colour of the big dry.

Student Holly Tomlinson said the approach was working.

"You know it is going to be a good day when you come here," she said.

Plays bring students together

Students from across drought-affected areas in the New England region of New South Wales are coming together to perform plays with ABC New England North West staff.

The first performance will be staged at Ben Lomond Public School where principal Kirsten Reim welcomed the distraction.

"These kids are fairly resilient, but we always talk about rain," she said.

"Every conversation starts with 'how much rain have you had?'"

Student Ruben Jolly, whose family owns a cattle property, said he was looking forward to the play.

"I've been practising 'If You're Happy and You Know It,'" he said.

Federal government announces drought aid

  Federal government announces drought aid The federal government will announce a $190 million drought assistance package to help farmers affected by the biggest dry in the past century.Farmers will receive immediate additional financial support to help them and their communities fight one of the worst droughts of the past century.

Hit the books = begin to study hard . In a brown study = daydreaming or deeply contemplative. Keep your nose to the grindstone = apply yourself conscientiously to your work . Sail through = succeed in doing something without difficulty.

Each time I got so nervous I kept making silly mistakes, failure is hard to accept, but I was such But she didn’t have to hear all the jokes about it afterwards from the other students . Then one morning at work I looked up from my desk and there he was right in front of me with a big smile on his face.

Performances will also take place at Bellata and Blackville.

Pictures: Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms

The Wider Image: Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms: A lone tree stands near a water trough in a drought-effected paddock on Jimmie and May McKeown's property located on the outskirts of town of Walgett, in New South Wales, Australia, July 20, 2018. From ground level, Australia's drought looks like a featureless, brown dustbowl, but from the air it transforms into an artistry of colour and texture as the land cracks under a blazing sun. Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms

Visit Drought SOS: For more news, informationand how to help Australian farmers.

SEQ schools must switch on to airconditioning for summer, say parents .
Heat-stressed students suffering 'nosebleeds, vomiting and headaches’ in sizzling classrooms.With Queensland struggling through one of the ­driest summers on record earlier this year, parents’ pleas for airconditioning comes as the Bureau of Meteorology predicts an increased chance of El Nino weather patterns for 2018-19 summer, with a greater chance of below-average rainfall.

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