Australia The story of Australia's only Indigenous WWII fighter pilot, Len Waters, told in new book

02:30  13 july  2018
02:30  13 july  2018 Source:   abc.net.au

Indigenous rangers get $87m funding boost

  Indigenous rangers get $87m funding boost Rangers who look after indigenous protected areas will share in more than $87 million to help them protect biodiversity and cultural heritage. Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said 48 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations across the country will share the funding."Indigenous Protected Areas support First Australians, to work on land and sea country, achieving significant conservation outcomes, connecting with country and culture and promoting Indigenous business," Mr Scullion said on Monday.

The History of Indigenous Australians began at least 65,000 years ago when Aboriginal Australians populated Australia . The Aboriginals were semi-nomadic hunter-gatherers with a strong spiritual

Jump to navigation Jump to search. Leonard Victor ( Len ) Waters (20 June 1924 – 24 August 1993) was the first Aboriginal Australian military aviator, and the only one to serve as a fighter pilot in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) during World War II .

Len Waters was Australia's first and only known Indigenous fighter pilot during World War II.© Provided by ABC News Len Waters was Australia's first and only known Indigenous fighter pilot during World War II. Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that the following story contains images and names of people who have died.

Len Waters was Australia's first and only known Indigenous fighter pilot during World War II.

He achieved the unthinkable, flying an elite fighter Kittyhawk — aptly named Black Magic — for the Royal Australian Air Force.

But like many of the estimated 3,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders who served during the Second World War, Mr Waters returned home as a forgotten hero.

Bank fees eroding up to 10% of income in remote communities

  Bank fees eroding up to 10% of income in remote communities Bank fees can chew up as much as a fifth of the incomes of some consumers living in remote Indigenous communities, the royal commission heard on Tuesday. Nathan Boyle, who works in the Australian Securities and Investments Commission's indigenous outreach program, told the royal commission in Darwin about the disproportionate impact of account-keeping fees, informal overdrafts, ATM fees, and dishonour fees on vulnerable consumers.© Supplied ASIC's Nathan Boyle, and Lynda Edwards, from Financial Counselling Australia, at the royal commission on Tuesday.

Official government estimates are that between one in ten and one in three indigenous Australian children The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page in Australia ' s history by righting the It tells the story of five fictional Aboriginal people by the names of Sandy, Ruby, Jimmy, Anne

Bruce and Andrea Leininger on the incredible true story of their son, James, as told in the NY Times bestselling book SOUL SURVIVOR: The Reincarnation of a

Mr Waters flew 95 operational sorties with 78 Squadron from 1943 to 1945 but when he returned home, he became a 'missing man' in Australia's wartime history.

It remained this way until his death in Cunnamulla, in western Queensland, in 1993.

But now, Len Waters' story will be told in the book Missing Man by author Peter Rees.

Who were Australia's original crocodile hunters?

  Who were Australia's original crocodile hunters? They were the beer-swilling, knife-wielding daredevils that would come to typify outback Australia. So what happened to Australia's old-school croc hunters?So just who were these daredevils that would come to typify outback Australia? And what happened to them?

the powerful story of Len Waters , the RAAF' s only WWII Aboriginal fighter pilot , Please Log In Or Sign Up to Create a Free Account and Get Access more than 10 million Books , Magazines & Comics for FREE!, ONLY REGISTERED USERS can read and download PDF Book for FREE.

Leonard Victor ( Len ) Waters (20 June 1924 – 24 August 1993) was the first Aboriginal Australian military aviator, and the only one to serve as a fighter pilot in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) during World War II .

Mr Rees and the extended Waters family held a book launch at Len Waters Place at Inala this week, which drew a crowd of about 300 people.

A story that 'had to be written'

Peter Rees first decided to write about Mr Waters when he heard that Badgery's Creek Airport at Sydney could be named after the fighter pilot.

He said Mr Waters' story had "intrigued" him.

"An Indigenous fighter pilot. The first and only. What an extraordinary feat in 1940s Australia," Mr Rees said.

"This was a story I did not know; it just had to be written. This book is about the power of one — one man's life, one man's story.

"Through the lens of one man's life, the larger story of racial discrimination and its ramifications for Indigenous people, generally, could be brought home to the Australian community in a very personal way.

"A man who breaks through the barriers of poverty, racial discrimination and limited schooling to realise a boyhood dream to fly."

Kids are keeping Aboriginal languages alive — and learning just how different they are

  Kids are keeping Aboriginal languages alive — and learning just how different they are Schools across the country are working with their local Indigenous communities to help protect Australia's first languages through the simple act of singing."Open your binungs!"

Death generated acclaim for Len Waters . Waters was a trailblazer who broke barriers to realise a childhood dream of becoming a fighter pilot – the first and only known Indigenous Australian ever to do so.

The History of Australia refers to the history of the area and people of the Commonwealth of Australia and its preceding Indigenous and colonial societies.

It was just 'the way it was'

Mr Waters' brother Kevin, who still lives in St George, Queensland, said he was very proud of how things had changed in Australia since he was young.

"Things are so much easier now that they were back in my days. As I say, you were a Murri and you kept your place. That's the way it was," said Mr Waters.

According to Mr Waters, when his brother returned from the war, he had hoped to set up a regional aviation service in south-west Queensland.

He had financial backing — all he needed was his civilian pilot's licence. But he was rejected for this licence five times because of his Aboriginality.

"They didn't think about his war service and his great record of flying. They didn't worry about the experience he had," Mr Waters said.

"It was just about his Aboriginality, that's all it came down to. It broke his heart."

Embracing the 'ability to be exceptional'

Early next month, Chris Sara will take over the position of Director General in the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships.

It will be a significant step for Mr Sara, who said humanity was the one thing that united all Australians.

Baby reunited with pilot who saved his life

  Baby reunited with pilot who saved his life A baby boy has been reunited with the pilot who saved his life, airlifting him to Brisbane after he stopped breathing during a difficult birth. William Gamble is now a happy and healthy 15-month-old, but just hours after he was born he nearly died due to a blood infection.His mother today met the man who flew her baby to safety, after he stopped breathing during birth."Thank you will never be enough," Briana Hile said.RACQ Life Flight pilot Andrew Bavage loaded the baby boy into a helicopter in Toowoomba and airlifted him to Brisbane for life-saving treatment in April last year.

Both brigades rapidly advanced against weak Japanese resistance, and most of north-west Borneo was liberated by the end of the war .[164] During the campaign the 9th Division was assisted by indigenous fighters who were waging a guerrilla war against Kent Town, South Australia : Avonmore Books .

Leonard Victor Waters Australia ’ s First and Only Aboriginal Fighter Pilot Extract from “My Father the Flyer – Was it Black Magic?” Dad’s aim for documenting his story was to encourage younger generations of Australians both indigenous and non- Indigenous to be inspired to take their own

"We've seen throughout Australia, and we see in the pages in this book, that there are times when our sense of race and culture and identity is important. But there are times when our sense of humanity is even more important," he said.

"When Len Waters is getting shot at by bullets, there's no time for racism … that's the time for all of us to be connected by humanity and for all of us to be the best that we can.

"When we acknowledge and we embrace the sense of capacity of Indigenous Australians, and our ability to be exceptional, magical things can happen."

'The sky's the limit'

Mr Waters' eldest daughter, Lenise Schloss, said she had been trying to tell her father's story for years, but people often didn't believe her "because it wasn't in history books".

Ms Schloss was a high school history teacher and a lecturer at the University of Canberra.

Despite this, she said her father always taught his children to chase their dreams and be proud of where they come from.

"As Father always said, the sky's the limit and you can always have a dream. And dreams can come true," she said.

"You just have to believe in yourself, be honest, have pride, have dignity, integrity and be accountable. And it'll all pay off."

Tennant Creek children involved in break-ins to steal food, Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion told .
The minister visited the troubled town of Tennant Creek to demonstrate the Commonwealth's contribution to tackling Indigenous disadvantage following calls — including from the Country Liberals — for the Prime Minister to show more interest and help fund solutions to social problems.Since the rape of a two-year-old girl in Tennant Creek in February, Senator Scullion has visited several times, and on Tuesday he invited the media to film his visit to services funded by the Federal Government in the town to ensure there can be no doubt about the contribution the Commonwealth is making to tackling Indigenous disadvantage in remote communities.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!