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Australia The mistake 4,816 people made on Anzac Day.

19:53  12 september  2017
19:53  12 september  2017 Source:   mamamia.com.au

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Anzac Day ! PURPOSE : For the children to explore and understand the link between the sacrice made by the Anzacs for our bodies and the sacrice Jesus Christ made for our souls. ‘ On Anzac Day we play the ‘Last Post’ and say the Anzac ode to remember the people who laid down their lives for us.’

Anzac Day was made a half- day holiday in 1916, and the pattern of the day 's events that occur now began at that time. People eagerly read descriptions of the landings and casualty lists – even if the latter made for grim news.

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As a nation, Anzac Day is an occasion which invites us to remember the innocent soldiers who lost their lives during the first major military battle fought by Australian and New Zealand forces in the First World War. It’s also an opportunity to commemorate all those Australians who have served and died in war in the decades since.

But Anzac Day has also a ‘lil bit become a day to go to the pub, drink excessively, and play two-up. Obviously, the day also requires significant documentation on social media, because if you didn’t post a #commemorative photo on Instagram, did you really remember the diggers at all?

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Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings. WRITING. Write about ANZAC Day for 10 minutes. Write about what happens around the world. Include two imaginary interviews with people who did something on this day .

Unfortunately, however, there seems to be some confusion over one of the central tenets of Anzac Day.

The Anzac Day dawn service held by the Currumbin RSL is seen at Elephant Rock on Currumbin Beach, Gold Coast. © Dave Hunt/AAP Image The Anzac Day dawn service held by the Currumbin RSL is seen at Elephant Rock on Currumbin Beach, Gold Coast. You see, there are just three words you need to get right, just THREE, for the day, and your Instagram posts about it, to make sense: Lest we forget.

Lest we forget means be careful not to forget, or serves as a plea not to forget the past sacrifices of those who have come before us.

But sometimes this can be confusing. How often do we really use the word 'lest'? Is it a word at all? For some people, 'lest we forget' sounds a lot like 'less we forget,' and surely they mean the same thing, right?

Wrong.

The phrase 'less we forget' literally makes no sense, whichever way you look at it. May we forget less? The less we forget, the better? Who knows. It's not a phrase. For a reason. Because it doesn't make sense.

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4 . Making demands. I know prosperity preachers who expect royal treatment when they go to foreign countries. One man told his host he needed a hotel that costs ,000 a night—in a nation where most people live in cramped If we don't, revival will only be a day instead of a growing movement.

I find that one of the mistakes people make is merchandising their characters. I don't like to do that because I like the day -to- day progression of people being introduced to things as I write them, but that's something that people definitely have done.

But approximately 4,816 people used the hashtag #lessweforget on Anzac Day, April 25.

Sometimes they were writing about their acai bowl, but also needed to acknowledge the importance of the date, and sometimes they had actually posted a photo of a war memorial, but failed to spell check/sense check their words.

"It's been such an emotional 24hours seeing the trenches and hearing some of there (sic) stories. #lessweforget," wrote one person.

But one of my favourites came from someone who LITERALLY posted a photo with the words 'lest we forget' written clearly, and STILL used the wrong hashtag.

Of course, there are several variations of the awkward typo. The hashtag #letsweforget was used 1,736 times, which definitely makes it seem like certain people are keen to forget about the sacrifices of the soldiers who have fought for our country.

It's a confusing phrase - yes. But 'lest we forget' also sums up the entire point of Anzac Day. Which is why I find it so funny that for all the typos to make on April 25, for thousands of people, this was it.

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But Anzac Day is also about commemorating what it means to be Australian, and I truly believe that the awkward typo, and the very pure intentions that come with it, are a fundamental part of the Aussie spirit.

#lessweforget

Forest fire engulfs Anzac battlefield in Gallipoli .
Helicopters with monsoon buckets combed the area where 2779 Kiwis died in WWI.Helicopters with monsoon buckets have been battling a major forest fire over the battlefields at Gallipoli where New Zealanders fought in World War I.

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