Travel Airbus and Zodiac Aerospace to develop cargo hold sleeping compartments on planes

06:56  15 april  2018
06:56  15 april  2018 Source:   Traveller

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That’s the idea being floated by plane manufacturer Airbus and seatmaker Zodiac Aerospace . The companies say they’re working to develop “ sleeping berths” that could be installed in the cargo holds of certain long-range Airbus aircraft. Airbus and Zodiac Aerospace say the cargo compartment

Airbus unveils plan to let passengers sleep in plane cargo holds . Aircraft manufacturer Airbus is partnering with aviation equipment supplier Zodiac Aerospace to develop new sleeping berths for passengers that would fit in the cargo compartment of planes .

An artist's impression of sleeping compartments being planned for the cargo holds of passenger aircraft.© Provided by Sydney Morning Herald An artist's impression of sleeping compartments being planned for the cargo holds of passenger aircraft. Ever wished you could get out of your uncomfortable economy class seat during a long-haul flight and have a lie down? Soon you might be able to.

Aircraft manufacturer Airbus is partnering with aviation equipment supplier Zodiac Aerospace to develop new sleeping berths for passengers that would fit in the cargo compartment of planes.

A design for an on-board medical care zone in the cargo hold.© Provided by Sydney Morning Herald A design for an on-board medical care zone in the cargo hold. The beds would be housed in removable modules that could be interchanged with regular cargo containers.

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European plane manufacturer Airbus and systems maker Zodiac Aerospace have announced that they are working to develop sleeping compartments , called “ sleeping berths”, to be installed in the cargo holds of long-range Airbus aircraft.

The partners haven't released too many details, but Airbus says that the modules will fit inside existing cargo compartments , can One might include selling access for passengers sitting elsewhere on the plane Booker and Tesco grow sales as integration gets under way. Airbus , Zodiac Aerospace to

"This approach to commercial air travel is a step change towards passenger comfort," Geoff Pinner, head of Airbus' cabin and cargo program says.

"We have already received very positive feedback from several airlines on our first mock-ups."

A design for a cargo hold kids zone.© Provided by Sydney Morning Herald A design for a cargo hold kids zone. While Pinner did not state which airlines had given feedback, it's likely one of them was Qantas.

Last month, Qantas CEO Alan Joyce revealed the airline was looking at potentially installing train-style bunk beds in its cargo holds for new, ultra-long-haul flights.

As part of the airline's Project Sunrise, Qantas is aiming to launch non-stop flights between Australia's east coast cities and London and New York. The airline last month launched the first-ever non-stop commercial flights between Europe and Australia, flying from Perth to London.

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Airbus and Zodiac Aerospace have partnered to develop and market passenger sleeping berths that would be installed inside aircraft cargo compartments . "We are now delighted to announce the availability of our

Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018, Hamburg Germany, 10th of April 2018, Airbus and Zodiac Aerospace have partnered to develop and market lower-deck modules with passenger sleeping berths. The modules, which would fit inside the aircraft’s cargo compartments

"One of the concepts that we have is maybe if we're not carrying freight you do something lower where cargo is on the aircraft, do you have an area where people can walk? Do you have berths like on a train?" he said.

"There's a lot of 'out there' thinking that's going on."

A design for a cargo hold lounge.© Provided by Sydney Morning Herald A design for a cargo hold lounge. Qantas had reportedly put the idea to Airbus and Boeing and this announcement from the European manufacturer indicates it is taking the concept seriously.

Airbus said in its announcement that the option would be available for its A330 planes by 2020. It was also looking into developing the beds for its new A350 XWB jets.

The designs released by Airbus show several other potential passenger uses for cargo modules, including conference rooms, kids play zones, a passenger lounge and a medical care centre.

So, how realistic is it that we will see these sleeping compartments?

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airbus has partnered with zodiac aerospace to develop lower-deck modules offering passengers a dormitory-type of accommodation. the modules have been designed to fit inside the aircraft’s cargo compartments and can be swapped in and out to tailor each aircraft to individual flight’s needs.

airbus has partnered with zodiac aerospace to develop lower-deck modules offering Geoff Pinner of Airbus described the plan for cargo - hold sleeping compartments as “a step change Passengers flying on Airbus SE planes will soon be able to slip down into the cargo hold for a proper nap.

A design for a cargo hold conference room module.© Provided by Sydney Morning Herald A design for a cargo hold conference room module. Many passengers are not aware of their existence, but similar spaces already exist on many planes. Crew and pilot rest areas, hidden above or below the main cabin, often feature full length beds and are accessed through hidden stairs at the front or rear of the plane.

But could passengers ever experience the same level of in-flight comfort? As with every airline decision, it will come down to the economics. Ultra-long-haul flights, taking 20 hours or more, will likely mean airlines are unable to carry as much weight in order to make the distance.

This could result in planes not being able to carry as much cargo, which in turn could result in otherwise unused space in the cargo hold.

Rather than have this space go to waste, installing sleeping berths, which would weigh far less than cargo, could create an additional revenue stream.

Instead of paying an extra $100 or so for an emergency exit row, passengers could pay an additional fee (likely to be several hundred dollars, at least) for access to the sleeping compartment.

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Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018, Hamburg Germany, 10th of April 2018 - Airbus and Zodiac Aerospace have partnered to develop and market lower-deck modules with passenger sleeping berths. The modules, which would fit inside the aircraft’s cargo compartments

Airbus and cabin interior specialist Zodiac Aerospace will develop lower deck modules with passenger sleeping berths and other facilities than can fit in an aircraft cargo compartment .

In the meantime, lying down on planes will remain the privilege of those fortunate enough to be flying in business or first class.

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