Health Australian women enduring outdated and invasive hysterectomies, UQ surgeon says

04:05  17 may  2018
04:05  17 may  2018 Source:   abc.net.au

Body modification crackdown pursued by NSW Health Minister

  Body modification crackdown pursued by NSW Health Minister <p>People undergoing procedures like split tongues and skin implants have "pretty major issues going on in their head", the New South Wales Health Minister says.</p>The plans to tighten the laws come after a woman died while undergoing a breast enhancement procedure at a Sydney cosmetic clinic earlier this year.

A lack of training for surgeons means up to 40 per cent of women are having open abdominal surgery over less invasive measures, a UQ professor says .

Australian women are having to suffer through invasive hysterectomies because gynaecologists have not updated their surgical skills, a University of Queensland researcher and gynaecologist says . He said this meant those gynaecologists were performing an outdated form of surgery

Professor Andreas Obermair says many surgeons are not trained in laparoscopic surgery.© Pixabay Professor Andreas Obermair says many surgeons are not trained in laparoscopic surgery. Australian women are having to suffer through invasive hysterectomies because gynaecologists have not updated their surgical skills, a University of Queensland researcher and gynaecologist says.

Professor Andreas Obermair said about 28,000 Australian women a year underwent hysterectomies, with 35 to 40 per cent of those carried out through open abdominal operations.

But he said the number of open surgeries needed be drastically reduced in favour of keyhole or vaginal operations.

"All [medical] societies suggest we should limit an abdominal hysterectomy and open surgery approach only to the cases where it's absolutely necessary," he said.

'People have never heard of the word': Plan to tackle endometriosis

  'People have never heard of the word': Plan to tackle endometriosis The government has vowed to lift the lid on the “silent epidemic” of endometriosis, the painful condition affecting 700,000 Australian women like Tara Smith.The Federal Government has vowed to lift the lid on the “silent epidemic” of endometriosis, detailing its plan to educate doctors, teachers and employers about the painful condition affecting 700,000 Australian women.

Aussie Women Enduring ' Outdated ' Hysterectomies . Thousands of Aussie women are being subjected to unnecessarily invasive surgeries every year, expert " Hysterectomy using an incision on the abdomen is almost in free-fall," Mr Robson said . "It is becoming an uncommon operation.

Australian women are undergoing unnecessarily invasive hysterectomies due to a lack of “However, we found surgeons were choosing to perform open hysterectomies instead because they were Media: Professor Andreas Obermair, a.obermair@ uq .edu.au, +61 7 3646 5485, Faculty of

"The risks include pain — obviously when you cut through tummy there will be pain, bleeding, haematoma, slower recovery and also infection."

Professor Obermair said laparoscopic surgery, or keyhole surgery, was better for the patient.

"The recovery is largely improved and quicker," he said.

Real bodies hit the fashion week catwalk

  Real bodies hit the fashion week catwalk The swim show at Australian Fashion Week has featured models of all shapes and sizes wearing bikinis and swimwear.What's more, they were wearing bikinis.

One in three women will have a hysterectomy by age 60. Choosing the right procedure and the right surgeon can be confusing. Be sure to choose a surgeon who has received comprehensive training and performs many minimally invasive hysterectomies each year.

"We send patients home these days after one or two nights.

"So recovery's better, complication rates are reduced by approximately 30 percent and ... the operation is less expensive than an open abdominal operation."

Lack of regulation and training

Professor Obermair said laparoscopic surgery came to Queensland in the early 2000s but many surgeons across the state were still not trained in the procedure.

He said this meant those gynaecologists were performing an outdated form of surgery, despite overwhelming evidence supporting less invasive measures.

"They haven't been trained — they just feel they can't offer an operation where they haven't been trained and they're not good at," Professor Obermair said.

"It is not so easy to train specialists because the community expects specialists know it all.

"It's hard for a specialist to make time available for surgical training and to upskill."

Women need to know about the link between the pill and depression .
The pill and other hormone contraceptives are not without side effects. We usually focus on the physical health effects of the pill, yet the most common reason women stop or change the pill is mental health side effects.Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating mental disorders in Australia, and affects twice as many women as men. It is estimated that one in four women will experience depression in her lifetime.One in four Australian women between the ages of 18 and 49 use the pill, at any one time. But few are aware of the link between the pill and depression.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!